Meet me in the middle

Changing lives matter

Each small gift of wisdom

Perfection is not in perfect

It’s what we do to aid others

Ease it not is

Conflicts cause difficulties, reasoning

Abilities to look beyond often are not pleasing

Hope is found, in connections similar, seeing some the same

 But not always

Piecing together important parts

Understanding reflections exist

Beyond this shallow water of illusions can we rise?

Or will we forever be denied knowing

What could have been?

I look out into the horizon letting the water lap over my feet.

The now clean beach is ready

The petitions in my mailbox, have been signed

Words are spoken, to people I meet

In the spirit, that they too will see kindness

It isn’t easy

Anger does come

Hurt

The hardships of compassion

They too bleed

It’s the hate, that damages us, the most

In eyes, that want to force us into sameness

Let’s Celebrate culture

Not deny it, the heritage we came from

When people fought for rights to live free

No matter what their race, sexuality, or belief

Why do we keep denying this?

I’ll keep writing poetry, til it ends

Beauty, love, hate, hurt, peace, beliefs, and non-beliefs

Where, can we find the serenity, the believers claim?

I don’t think it will be when we are all the same

Only, when we embrace diversity will the anger subside

Helping our neighbors, in spite of the challenges, we face within us

Because outside us our hands are needed

To rise, above the system created to defeat us.

by

Angela K. Crandall

©9/7/17

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War Aftermath

I give thanks for those who

Fought for me

Even though I don’t agree

I wish war didn’t exist

But I must admit

How else can we protect each other?

Sisters and brothers

From the hurt and pain

What culture is right?

Which one is wrong?

What have we known from all along?

If only love could truly save us

Then others would see it to

And no longer would we have to see

red blood dripping from

The Red White and Blue

Must the Stars fall one by one?

Till there are no soldiers standing

No-one on either side remaining

Til we disappear

Fighting to the death

For what we each have left

Only for nothing to remain.

by

Angela K. Crandall

©5/22/15

My thoughts on un-documented immigrants

    Today I responded to someone on face book on the issue of undocumented immigrants, mainly the children who are trying to make it over the border to the United States, to gain freedom, hope, independence. There are some who feel they come to steal our jobs, eat our bread, and take away what we need to survive. I can understand their point of view, but also see the side of someone who is trying to better themselves. Their own country has abandon them, beaten them down, taken away any ounce of hope to succeed so they come here, children with no parents to try to make a better life. I think its pretty sad. Here is my response:

           The problem is Brian do you have at least empathy for these people? If not then I can not tolerate your view, but empathy is a part of humanity, and if you have no empathy for those who suffer, who see things differently, then where is our humanity going? Yes, it would be great if everyone who wanted to be a legal citizen of the United States could, but we are talking children. How are they supposed to get money to pay for such a thing? Parents don’t always take care of their children. Does that mean they should pay for their parent’s crimes against them, for choosing to have them as many are against abortion? I am pro-choice, but everyone has different ideas. I just don’t think we should promote suffering, or speak unkindly about others trying to better their own lives. We all struggle to find our place, to exist, to be, and everyone on this planet has a right to try to rise above the machines called corporations, the 1%, and those who wish harm on others. When we lose our ability to see things from others points of view we lose ourselves, and while yes, this is a bad situation we need to do something about it in a way that shows empathy for these children, and not hate. If they are to be deported back we must do it in a way that shows kindness, love, and empathy. However, I do think they deserve proper care, and it is sad that their own country is unable and will not provide it for them.

                                                        Angela K. Crandall